Friday, 15 July 2011

Dartmoor days - Medieval Clapper Bridge


Driving around on Dartmoor National Park, you can completely loose yourself down small winding lanes and suddenly find yourself in a time warp. This traditional Chocolate box cottage was too hard to ignore with our camera.


The views are breathtaking.


A Toll house, the days when you would have to pay a toll to use the road. A price for every goat, pig, sheep and cow, cart and person.


Some of the bridges, are easier to cross than others. This is a Medieval Clapper bridge. 



Sheep rustling is starting to be a problem on the moor, the reason why sheep owners have taken to dipping their sheep in dye. It seems to be the best deterrent known so far as the sheep can be easily recognised.


Not all the sheep are in fields, many of them roam across the moor and roads.


Not every four legged beauty is so good at crossing the road.


Prince Town high on the Moor has some new buildings since we last visited.


A new craft centre. The visitors centre is still there, but be warned they are now charging for the privilege of entering. It's Summer time and to be expected. You have been warned.......


 The three wheeled reliant was built in 1948. It's probably just about the right size to squeeze itself down some of the roads on the moor we find.


This is Margaret who we met inside the craft centre.  It's always great to see art and then meet the artist.
Margaret's web site isn't completed yet, but as soon as I have a link I'll put it on and you can visit Margaret's other work.


Mostly our meander on the moor always ends up stopping for tea.
This time we were lucky enough to find a tea shop that also had  geese, ducks, chickens, goats, rabbits.


They were all well kept and well looked after.


They even had some for sale. Very tempted.


Although someone watching with their beady eye, it put me off.
I do however know of another blog that can tell you more about chicks than I can...
Probably about their beady eye's too. 
HI REBEKAH..... you can find Rebekah HERE   Feather, Beak and Claw.

6 comments:

Dolores said...

It's always nice to meet the artist. I would be interested in her web site once you get it. We can't have fowl in the city anymore.

Faye Henry said...

Thank you so much Midge for the lovely daytrip.. It reminds me a lot of some of the hills near home called Cornhill...
Beautiful and as always I love the sheep.. Interesting that they dye them...
Have a great weekend..

Sue said...

What a wonderful visit. The bridge was most interesting, though I don't think I'd care to cross it. I'm not too fond of bridges and that one looks quite narrow.

Tweedles -- that's me said...

Oh Midge
There is so much beauty in your land. And you are an awsome photographer.
You share your world,.. just like your lovely letters that you send.
You tell a story,, that we do not want to end.
Thank you Midge
love
tweedles

Lynda (Granny K) said...

Great to see the Reliant - Back in 1958 our teacher had one of those and would offer up to four children a lift to school in it out of the goodness of his heart; (we would be standing at the bus stop and used to groan when we saw him coming!) We had to squeeze into the back, no seat-belts! We then proceeded down a very steep hill to school! 'Health & Safety'? - No such thing! :o)

SilverNikNats said...

Some beautiful pics love that cottage but dont think I would have been able to cross that bridge!